Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image

The Blue & Gray Press | August 18, 2018

Scroll to top

Top

Ardent Pokemon collectors still trying to catch them all

By ADAM STERGIS

pokemon3 With the release of the latest entries in the franchise,” Pokémon X” and “Pokémon Y,” the series appears as much more than a nostalgic remnant of the late 90s.

What is it about “Pokémon” that kept it relevant and successful for so many years?

Collecting is a deeply addicting and involved hobby that enters many lives of some point, is baseball cards or vinyl records.

The pure drive of collecting and being proud of findings is the heart and soul of the “Pokémon” games.

Just as previous generations showed off prized, rare baseball cards during school, children during the late 90s were all congregating at recess to flaunt their cherished Dragonite.

In an article written for 1Up.com, Justin Haywald noted many people keep coming back to “Pokémon” due to the comfort of repetition in collecting and training their creatures.

Though there are new additions to each new Pokémon game to keep the series fresh for longtime enthusiasts, the core mechanics of collecting remain steady and familiar.

Baseball cards have not remained exactly the same for over 50 years, but people still steadily collects the cards, just as “Pokémon” games ultimately revolved around training and collecting for over 15 years.

Even a fan does not pick up an entry in the series in years, the decision to play again will be met with a familiar, comfortable experience.

The “Pokémon” franchise saw an unparalleled level of relevance compared to its contemporaries from the 90s. Other brands such as Bean Babies, vied for the public eye at the time, yet it was the adorable entourage of “Pokémon” that lasted for years to come.

In an article for Wired.com, Chris Kohler postulated that it is the onslaught of media surrounding the franchise that could have potentially resulted in its lasting success.

Everything from a TV series to a fleet of All Nippon Airways jets adorned with Pikachu’s cuddly visage helped raise public awareness of the “Pokémon” brand.

This media blitz could have boosted the franchise’s lasting appeal, but Kohler states that the immense popularity of the series is still a resounding mystery.

What keeps the “Pokémon” games selling millions of units worldwide 15 years after its debut is anyone’s guess.

One clear trait of the franchise is that there exists a passionate fan base spanning people of all ages.

While many have consistently kept these monsters close to their hearts for years, others see the games as entertainment for children.

Video games of all genres are hobbies, no matter what the public perception of the intended audience should be.

Ultimately, “Pokémon” games are not made strictly for young or adult audiences; rather, they are made for the fans.

If a person is enjoying their hobby, regardless of what it may be, age does not matter.