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The Blue & Gray Press | October 20, 2017

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Editorial: The severity of the Ebola virus

By THE BLUE & GRAY PRESS

While the topic of Ebola continues to rule headlines, we would like to take a moment to emphasize the fact that, despite the amount of jokes that have been made in the media or perhaps even by friends, this disease is incredibly serious and should not be made into a laughing matter.

The fact is that this outbreak is not a joke, as it is affecting over 10,000 members of the African population and has already claimed the lives of over 5,000.

We at The Blue & Gray Press are disgruntled with the lack of sympathy on a subject that is all too prevalent in the country currently.

For example, our country is debating travel bans that would halt the travel of many people who have been helping fight this disease in other countries, as well as those who wish to continue the fight.

CBC News, a Canadian news source, reported that last week the World Health Organization projected that by Dec. 1 the number of new Ebola cases in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone would be 5,000 to 10,000 per week.

These projections could result in death rate tolls on an annualized basis that would put Ebola at the number six spot on the list of most deaths from communicable diseases around the world.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working closely with the World Health Organization, state and local health departments, clinicians and other partners to better understand and manage the public health risks posed by Ebola Virus Disease. As of Oct. 17, one imported case and two secondary cases of Ebola virus disease have been identified in the United States.

It is imperative to understand that where this disease is hitting the hardest is a place where medicine is close to unattainable. Doctors from all over the world have traveled to eradicate the advances of this disease because Africa itself is a continent that does not have enough resources to handle the disease.

Sierra Leone alone has a life expectancy of 55 years. It is one of the poorest countries in the world. Organizations such as UNICEF and Doctors Without Borders have been continuously working to help in countries such as these, but there has been slow improvement.

Moreover, the disease spreads more easily in these areas. It is not until the disease has started to show physical signs that the infected even realize they are sick. Therefore, the disease rapidly continues to grow in cases.

In conditions such as these, we ask that our community rise above and realize the severity of this disease, and be conscious not to make insensitive jokes.

Comments

  1. A. Kaufman

    What a boring response.

    If one issue is banned from any kind of joke because it’s real and could offend, then all issues should be banned and all humor should be outlawed.

    I swear, every year this paper gets more and more humorless and the editorials more and more self-important.