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The Blue & Gray Press | August 19, 2017

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Dressing for Success with Chelsea

Dressing for Success with Chelsea

By CHELSEA FULLER

We’ve all been there: 9 a.m., alarm clock ringing and already 10 minutes behind for an over-scheduled day. Jumping out of bed, you throw a shirt on over your sweats, grab your bag and run out the door to class. But those days are, hopefully, not everyday.

Why then do we keep dressing like everyday is such a burden? Well, between practice, class and dreary winter weather, it’s hard to find a reason to actually make oneself presentable to the public, or even to a small, liberal arts campus community.

While there are a plethora of excuses to don those fleece-lined sweats or overstretched leggings, there are plenty more reasons to get dressed.

First and foremost, it shows respect for others. There has never been a day when your professor rolled into class wearing a hoodie over jeggings, primarily because to do so would be to tell everyone that they would rather be in bed. Though at times this may be the case for some of us, by getting dressed, classmates and teachers alike will undoubtedly notice that you are not only are ready for the day, but also that you take your academics seriously.

It is not just our professors that are picking up the message, but fellow students as well. Respect for others is important, but perhaps not as motivating as respect for ourselves. By dressing for our day, we naturally demand respect from others, more so than if you are wearing yoga pants and a torn shirt.

When you get dressed for class, you send unspoken messages that you are here to learn, interact and get the most out of our education. This “ready for the day” attitude then becomes contagious, eventually changing the dynamic of the classroom from a let’s-get-this-over-with attitude to a lets-get-this-started atmosphere.

In case the whole “respect” aspect is not incentive enough to keep you looking sharp, it is a good habit to bring with you into the workforce. Whether you are working now or just concentrating on school, a career is in the not-so-distant future for all of us. By getting into a rhythm of looking your best for your job – and for many of us school is our job – you can condition yourself to make pants and blouses your go-to instead of pajamas or running shorts.

Of course it is very simple to say that getting dressed for class is the way to go, it is another to act on it, especially when looking at a 20-degree morning outside of your window or a very enticing snooze button.

Whatever the case may be, there are ways to take short cuts and still look your best.

For instance, try laying clothes out the night before as part of your evening ritual or make go-to outfits that are tried and true; whenever you pull out that skirt, you’ll know it pairs perfectly with that sweater, or those shoes always merit that pair of pants. Whatever your short cut is, make it possible. As the saying goes dress for success, be it in the classroom or the job market. The best way to tackle your day is with preparedness and style.

Comments

  1. Megan

    In a previous article the author, Chelsea Fuller, states that one should dress well for what fits one’s body. Here, in regards to jeggings, I believe the author contradicts her previous message. Jeggings are worn by fashion celebrity icons like Kate Bosworth, Kim Kardashian, Victoria Beckham, etc. Therefore, I think slamming peers for wearing jeggings is misplaced: “There has never been a day when your professor rolled into class wearing a hoodie over jeggings, primarily because to do so would be to tell everyone that they would rather be in bed. Though at times this may be the case for some of us, by getting dressed, classmates and teachers alike will undoubtedly notice that you are not only are ready for the day, but also that you take your academics seriously.” Advising peers how to properly wear jeggings would have been more appropriate, friendly, and constructive.

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