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The Blue & Gray Press | April 24, 2017

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Staff Ed: African American museum serves as necessary and timely reminder of America’s past

Staff Ed: African American museum serves as necessary and timely reminder of America’s past

By THE BLUE & GRAY PRESS STAFF

Today, American society is facing a crucial moment in history with the emergence of the Black Lives Matter movement. It is difficult to ignore such a crisis when so many have been faced with multiple tragedies and so much chaos, all of which floods the news and social media constantly.

The Black Lives Matter movement has moved across the nation and as a result, U.S. society has been compelled to question its values and morals on a daily basis. When one sees so many lives lost, the police brutality, violence, and protests filling the cities it is impossible to ignore what is happening within this movement. Amidst the growing cries for justice, an opportunity for change and a step towards hope has taken place in the capital.  

On Sept. 24, the National Museum of African American History and Culture opened in Washington D.C. The museum’s opening marked a historic occasion as the museum is the first to be exclusively dedicated to the documentation of African American life, history and culture.

Former President George Bush was quoted by the Washington Post, stating how the museum shows a commitment to truth. This statement signifies a great deal to the nation as a whole.  “It shows our commitment to truth. A great nation does not hide its history. It faces its flaws and corrects them,” President Bush stated. This museum marks an opportunity for the nation to face its flaws and to try to change the world that too many struggle in today.

The establishment of the museum could not be more timely than it is now. The long awaited dedication of anything to the people who built this country many believe is tremendously deserved. Given the times, this opening marks a chance for hope and unity in our country’s future.

The building signifies a belonging for so many that have never been recognized and it gives a meaning to U.S. history that has long been overshadowed. President Obama’s inaugural words rang true and proud as he repeated the words of poet Langston Hughes: “I, too, am America.” With the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the first steps have now been taken to recognize that black lives do matter not only  today but throughout our nation’s history. How the nation proceeds is yet to be determined however, the hopes that this esteemed recognition of black lives will take the nation forward are high.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2016/09/24/african-american-museum-opening-a-historic-day-on-the-national-mall/

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