The Blue & Gray Press

The University of Mary Washington Student Newspaper

Volleyball coach Matt Troy serves his way out

3 min read
By ASHLEIGH GRIM Staff Writer Women’s volleyball coach, Matt Troy, has stepped down from the head coach position, as he has accepted a full-time coaching position with the Division III volleyball team at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

UMW Athletics

By KRISTEN LEWERS

Staff Writer

Women’s volleyball coach, Matt Troy, has stepped down from the head coach position, as he has accepted a full-time coaching position with the Division III volleyball team at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

Assistant Athletic Director and UMW employee of 23 years, Clint Often, had complimentary words to say about his departing colleague, “Coach Troy brought a great winning culture to UMW.”

Often was not exaggerating about him facilitating a “great winning culture.” Under Troy’s guidance, the women’s volleyball program garnered many victories to boast of. These include participating in three NCAA Championship tournaments, winning Mary Washington the Capital Athletic Conference for the first time in over 20 years, and maintaining a record of 133-57.

“He has been a terrific coach, colleague, and team member for the Department of Athletics. This opportunity is a great one for him and his family, and we wish him all the best,” said Often about Troy.

Troy is no stranger to Johns Hopkins’ volleyball program. He spent 2010-2012 coaching the Blue Jays in the part time position of head coach before coming to Mary Washington in 2012 as the full time coach. Now that his previous position at Hopkins has been moved to full time status, he is returning and resuming coaching in Maryland.

Peyton Dunow said that it is an emotional change and that the resignation did come as shock, but has even brought the team closer together. She continued on to say, “Coach Troy was a great coach who was committed to challenging us and pushing us to be the best. He taught all of us so much and we will miss him a lot but we wish him all the best at Hopkins.”

Another team member, Kennedy Stukes, echoed Dunow’s sentiment that it was shocking adding, “Everyone is coping differently, it was hard and still is for everyone just wondering each day who is going to come in and be the new coach and who will better the program just as well as Coach Troy did.” She also described Troy as having been an encouraging and uplifting coach, and sends her well-wishes as he assumes his new post at Hopkins.

Patrick Catullo also spoke to the positive impact Troy has left behind. The Interim Director of Athletics said, “Coach Matt Troy has been a great colleague over the last six years and has been instrumental in creating a nationally competitive volleyball team,” echoing Often’s sentiment, and adding, “he has been a terrific mentor to his staff and student-athletes.”

John Hopkins is obviously gaining a valuable asset to its athletic program, but what are the next steps for the Mary Wash volleyball program?

Catullo assures that the volleyball team will conduct business as usual while the Athletic Department’s search for a new head coach will be underway this spring. Assistant volleyball coach, Emma Olson, will be stepping up as interim head coach this spring until a new candidate is decided upon.

The way Catullo speaks of her, she is definitely up to the job. In addition to being assistant coach, Olson was also a student athlete at Mary Washington from 2013-2017, under the guidance of Matt Troy during her time as volleyball player. Her other accolades include being an NCAA All-American.

Though Troy left big shoes to fill, it will be exciting to see one of Mary Wash’s own step up to the plate, and set the women’s volleyball team up to continue its streak of success. 

Olson was unavailable to make a comment.

When asked if there were any final words he would like for Troy to hear, Director Catullo responded, “I would like to thank Matt for his service and dedication to the department and I wish him the best of luck with his new position.”

A previous version of this article was incorrectly attributed to Ashleigh Grim. It has since been corrected.

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